Christian Lamm

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C2 Functional analysis of the interaction between host chaperones and viral transport proteins

Principal investigator
Uwe Sonnewald

Mentor
Manfred Marschall

Utilization of a HCMV Protein to study conserved structural features of plant and vertebrate nuclear envelopes

After host infection, successful replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) depends on formation of a nuclear egress complex that enables viral nucleocapsids to leave the nucleus. Part of this complex is the HCMV protein pUL50, which is anchored to the inner nuclear membrane. Experiments with GFP-tagged pUL50 in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana showed that the protein is also localized to the plant nuclear envelope. Therefore, we aim to use the viral protein as a tool to identify conserved structures of plant and vertebrate nuclear envelopes.

Figure:CLSM pictures show Arabidopsis thaliana epidermis cells that transiently express GFP:pUL50. The viral Protein is not only able to target vertebrate nuclei, but also plant nuclei and thus can be used as a molecular tool to study conserved structures of the nucleus.

 

Mode of action of DnaJ-like proteins during potyvirus infection

Members of the large genus of potyviruses cause damage in many different plant systems and thus pose a serious problem for agriculture. In this subproject we investigate the role of host proteins during potyvirus infection.
Previous studies could show that the Potato Virus Y capsid protein interacts with the tobacco DnaJ-like protein NtCPIP1. This interaction is crucial for successful host infection. Similarly, proper interaction of the Arabidopsis DnaJ-like protein AtDjB23 with the Turnip Mosaic Virus capsid protein is essential for viral spread. Through interaction with NtCPIP1, Potato Virus Y capsid protein seems to be degraded via HSP70. This process is believed to be necessary for successful unpacking of viral RNA and subsequent replication and translation. Although required co-chaperones of this system remain unknown, potential candidates are BAG proteins as well as SIAH proteins. These candidates will be further characterized, which may lead to insight into modes of action of potyvirus infection.

 

Publications

Lamm, C. E., Link, K., Wagner, S., Milbradt, J., Marschall, M., & Sonnewald, U. (2016). Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Proteins Ectopically Expressed in the Heterologous Environment of Plant Cells are Strictly Targeted to the Nuclear Envelope. Viruses, 8(3), 73. 

 

Presentations

October 2016 8th Annual Retreat, Erlangen School of Molecular Communication, Schloss Schney, Lichtenfels, Germany
”Investigating the role of the cochaperone Hop/Sti1 in infections with potato virus Y”
Poster
     
October 2015 2. International SFB796 Conference: Mechanisms of microbial host cell manipulation: From plants to humans, Erlangen, Germany
”Heterologous protein expression in plants: Approaches to investigate the nucleus”
Poster&Talk
     
July 2015 7th Annual Retreat, Erlangen School of Molecular Communication, Schloss Hirschberg, Beilngries, Germany
”Heterologous protein expression in plants: Approaches to investigate the nucleus”
Talk
     
Februar 2015 28. Tagung Molekularbiologie der Pflanzen, Dabringhausen, Germany
”Interaction of potato virus Y coat protein with NtHop2 is necessary for symptom development and efficient viral spread”
Poster
     
July 2014 6th Annual Retreat, Erlangen School of Molecular Communication, Kloster Banz, Bad Staffelstein, Germany
“HCMV in plants: Heterologous expression of herpesviral proteins”
Talk
     
Februar 2014 27. Tagung Molekularbiologie der Pflanzen, Dabringhausen, Germany
Interaction of the HCMV proteins with structures of the plant nucleus"
Poster
     
July 2013 5th Annual Retreat, Erlangen School of Molecular Communication, Kloster Banz, Bad Staffelstein, Germany
Interaction of the HCMV Protein pUL50 with Structures of the Plant Nuclear Envelope & Mode of Action of DnaJ-like Proteins during Potyvirus Infection
Talk